Wednesday, 20 January 2021

Week 40: SpamALot

 

Week 40:

SpamALot

We’ve been together for 40 weeks now. I think I can share some deeply personal information with you. I have a pet peeve. Many, in fact, but, this one relates to this week’s challenge. When I am in a store, take my items to the checkout, and the cashier asks me for my email address. Now that might not bug some of you. Vive la difference. But for me, it’s right up there with “have a good one”. A good one what, I’m not totally sure, but thanks for the well wishes.

When someone asks me for my email, I smile and say no thank you. But, inside, I’m thinking about all the junk they’re going to send me, all the luring to buy cheap goods at low prices. The drive to consumerism, and the already too much stuff that I am lucky enough to have acquired in my lifetime (I vacillate between obsessive packrat and Swedish death cleansing). I know that this innocent request translates into consumer reports, data mining and ways to manipulate us into buying more.

In the spirit of a previous challenge where we began cleaning out our emails,  this week we’ll go one step further. We’ll avoid amassing all those emails in the first place. 

Did you know that 78% of all incoming email is spam? Spam is defined as any unwanted or unsolicited email you receive. About 62 trillion spam messages are sent annually. That’s not the bad news. The bad news is that it requires 33 billion kilowatt hours of energy to power, resulting in 20 million tonnes of CO2 emissions per year. Wow. Just to hear from a Nigerian prince in crisis, or to find out that Old Navy has jeans on sale (again)? 

So, what exactly do we do about it?

Challenge 40: Unsubscribe.

Unsubscribe from sites that encourage you to buy things.

Beyond the annoyance of unwanted email, most of these messages simply want you to buy more more more! Consumerism is alive and well. If we are going to break free of unhealthy habits, we need to consider how much we purchase, whether we need it, and why we want it. Being satisfied with what we have isn’t part of the human condition. In an age where having the newest gadget is all the rage, having offers sent to your inbox makes it all the more difficult to restrain. Compound that by being in lockdown, and you get the picture. You have done a good thing by thwarting temptation! 

Email addresses are a valuable commodity amongst companies trying to get their hands on your wallet. Why? Because they’re a lead. And, unlike the archaic “phone book” where you can look up a person’s name, address and telephone number, there isn’t an “email book” where you can find people’s email addresses. It requires asking directly, or more devious approaches. In essence, it’s harder to get, and when you have it, you have direct access to that person. 

There are very few places you can go, online or otherwise, that does not request you to “sign up”, “get free stuff” or “subscribe”. Why are they giving away such great stuff for free? Because they want your email address!

Handing out your email address willy nilly is not a wise idea. It clogs up your inbox, and leads to the data pollution we talked about before. It also leaves you vulnerable to a bunch of unsolicited information, and scams. Beyond that, there are people actively seeking your email, so they can send you garbage. 

Your email gets dispersed through online subscriptions, social media, online forms and scraping tools. This information is purchased by marketers who use it to target you. You can “unsubscribe” from these emails. There must legally be a link at the bottom so you can do this. If there isn’t, many providers (like Gmail) offer you an “unsubscribe” tool at the top of the page. Going through your emails and selecting the ones you really could live without (hopefully it’s not us!) will get the process started. 

All in all, junk mail is cluttering up our virtual world, and wasting tons of energy unnecessarily. You can be part of the solution with a few simple steps.

After you unsubscribe, here are some more tips from Norton on how to unclutter your inbox. In the article, there are steps outlined for most providers if you’re not sure how to go about it. 
  • Delete junk mail or messages from unfamiliar senders without opening them. 
  • Mark spam or advertising as “spam” and report it. 
  • Keep your email private. Don’t share it with anyone unless absolutely necessary. 
  • Use a third-party spam filter. There are lots of options out there, some free, some not (like McAfee, Norton, AVG). 
  • Change your email address or create an address solely for online purchases. 

Now that you’re spam free, you’ve done your part for the planet this week. Put your feet up and enjoy a job well done!
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Yours in Sustainability,
Sherri Jackson & Laurel Hood

52 Weeks of Climate Action was created by Sherri Jackson and Laurel Hood. Sherri is a writer, speaker and musician. She is the candidate of record and communications coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Laurel Hood, is a retired secondary teacher, transportation lead for the Collingwood Climate Action Team, and volunteer coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Visit our blog or sign up at www.52weeksofclimateaction.com.

Wednesday, 13 January 2021

Week 39: Stay on Solid Ground

 

Week 39:

Stay on Solid Ground

This week’s challenge will be extremely easy for us after yesterday’s new lockdown announcement. We were going to explain to you all the reasons why we should limit travelling, but, the risk of spreading a deadly pandemic honestly wasn’t on our radar when we came up with these challenges a year ago!

Still, it seems some people haven’t gotten the message that we should be staying put. Exhibit A - the number of public figures who took international holidays in the past month, while the rest of us were deciding whether to change into clean track pants, or leave on the ones we’ve worn for the past week. 

The pandemic just adds an exclamation mark to our challenge this week. We’re talking about air travel and cruises, and the damage they do to our environment. 

I know you’re aware of all the amazing pictures of nature regenerating and healing. Fish in the canals of Venice. Clear vistas in India and New York. Wildlife in the streets. With all our machinations over how to heal the planet, the obvious answer is, stop doing damage, and then get out of the way. The reason we have seen an almost 10% decrease in planetary emissions in 2020 is literally because we are not doing as much damage. Less factories spewing chemicals, way less air flights and cars on the roads. More people working from home. And, significantly, less tourism. We’re not pumping as much into the atmosphere, and that’s a good thing. But, as we know, it’s short lived once the pandemic loosens its grip.

Studies show that emissions from tourism account for about 8% of the global total. Air travel makes up a good portion of this. Cruises do not get off so easily either - they are tremendous abusers, not only with huge emissions, but in general pollution of our oceans. 

So, once we are given the all-clear for business as usual, we need to reconsider whether that’s really what we want. Are we going back to the way we were, or are we going to accept the gift of this time to think, and change things for the better? 

Challenge 39: Analyze how you travel.

If you love to travel, review your travel plans. Commit to reducing your air travel and cruises. If you just can’t face (in normal times) a Canadian winter, here are some tips to reduce your impact when you do travel:
-Book direct flights. One flight is better than 2 or 3 connecting flights.
- Stay longer. I’m sure you don’t need convincing to do that (good option)!
-Go less often. If you normally take a distance holiday once a year, cut it back to once every second or third year (better option)
- Don’t fly (best option). Choose holidays where you can take a train or drive instead.
-If you do fly, buy carbon offsets - which is too little too late in my opinion but at least it’s something.

If you’re looking for some more tips, try this BBC article.

With many of us on limited holiday time, we’ve taken a Type-A personality approach to our holidays. Get in, get out as fast as possible. Fill the interval between with abundant activity to get your money/time worth. Take massive amounts of pictures to remind yourself you were away, because you didn’t actually have time to take in your surroundings. Sounds relaxing, doesn’t it? 

I read a lovely article by someone who had taken the train recently. She mentioned how wonderful it was to see the scenery go by, to have a pleasant meal in the dining car, to chat with fellow travellers. In essence, she was talking about how the journey is the destination. Getting there is half the fun, if you let it be.

I know if you have ever driven south with a car full of children, you may be cocking an eyebrow at that. You’re right. If you’re looking for perfection, I have bad news. It isn’t real. There is no way to have a perfect vacation. But, there are a million ways to have a really good one. And, all those things that seem like disasters when they’re happening turn out to be your funny stories that will keep on entertaining family gatherings for years to come. It’s all gold.

I am a fan of distant and exotic travel. I love a new culture, new language, new experiences. So, I was skeptical about the staycation until we tried it. We rented a cottage about an hour from home, on the water, with a sandy beach. It was a raving success. I felt like I had been away for a month. I read at least five books sitting with my feet in the sand, and my kids playing nearby. We ate all kinds of things that are terrible for us. We played crazy games and did puzzles. We went for sunset walks every night, and had a campfire on the beach with guitars and lots of laughter. Everyone could do what fit for them, without the stress of “where is your passport”, and “do you seriously have to pee, AGAIN!” We’ve revisited that cottage at least twice a summer for the past 8 years. Now, my sister and her family come too, and cousins enjoy spending long hours swimming, paddle boarding and building sandcastles together. We’re having a wonderful time, and also building family bonds that I hope will last long after I’m gone.

So while you’re stuck at home for the next month, review your travel options. You may find that being at home is actually the best place in the world to be. As T.S. Eliot said, 

...the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.


Be grateful for where you live, and what you have.
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Yours in Sustainability,
Sherri Jackson & Laurel Hood

52 Weeks of Climate Action was created by Sherri Jackson and Laurel Hood. Sherri is a writer, speaker and musician. She is the candidate of record and communications coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Laurel Hood, is a retired secondary teacher, transportation lead for the Collingwood Climate Action Team, and volunteer coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Visit our blog or sign up at www.52weeksofclimateaction.com.

Wednesday, 6 January 2021

Week 38: Hey You, Get Off My Cloud!

 

Week 38:

Hey You, Get Off My Cloud!

Newsflash: your data is dirty. That fluffy cloud up there isn’t a real thing, where your photos from 2010 are floating peacefully in a rainbow fog. I know. You never really considered it before, but, it’s a problem, because everyone is dumping their files into the atmosphere, literally, and we don’t give it a second thought. Ta-da! Here we are to shed a little light on the subject!

Let’s do an experiment. Take a look at the number of songs in the playlists you’ve got. Then consider the number of streaming services you subscribe to, and the number of hours you spend watching or listening to them. Social media accounts? They’re rife with data too. Now check your email and Google Drive. How many files? Then, check that special place where pictures go to die - how many photos and videos do you have stored?

I’m guessing a whole ton. Gigabytes upon gigabytes of saved data. Now, imagine what it would look like if we went back 30 years, and all those things were actually in your house in real life, in real time. How many rooms of mail and documents would you have? How many storage containers of files would you need? How many CDs, DVDs, newspapers, magazines, books and photo albums? I’m guessing a whole lot more than you could cram into your space.

When we had to physically handle our own paperwork, and develop expensive film into photos, we were more discriminating. After all, who needs a whole room dedicated to junk mail? But, here in the shiny new digital age, we have gotten lazy when it comes to cleaning house. After all, it’s just an unopened email or two (or 1000), and how bad could a bunch of photos you’ll never look at really be? Well, surprisingly, pretty bad. Let’s investigate.

Just like a houseful of documents, all those electronic files have to be stored somewhere. They’re not just floating around all innocent, even though that’s what we’ve been encouraged to believe. All that storage occurs on servers somewhere, and those servers need energy to run. Data centres that house all this storage must run 24/7, and require massive amounts of energy to cool them. 

It’s estimated that the amount of energy required to service our digital storage is equal or greater to the amount of energy the airline industry uses. It’s a lot. It’s about 2% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

In the US, streaming music dumps between 25,000 - 40,000 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere annually. Netflix and other streaming services are a big part of the problem too, and as televisions get bigger, resolution gets sharper, and length of shows gets longer, even more energy is required to service them. It’s estimated that by 2025, the technology sector will consume 25% of the world’s total electricity, and world annual traffic will increase by 60%, to 175 Zettabytes (175 trillion gigabytes), with cloud computing as the driving force. That's astronomical.

Now, let’s talk about photo storage. It’s oh so easy to take 20 pictures when one would do. Then, upload them, and forget about them. I confess that I have lost complete control of my photo files, and now have absolutely no idea where anything is. I have multiple copies in multiple folders, and I regularly spend hours trying to make sense of it only to retreat and fight another day. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone.

Email is yet another dirty secret, where hundreds of files clutter up servers and suck up energy unnecessarily. So you get the picture. We’re virtually storing way more stuff than we need to, and while cloud computing has become a norm of society, there are things that can be done to mitigate the damage.

Cloud storage is dominated by many big players - Google, Amazon, Apple. To their credit, some are working toward net zero emissions. Unfortunately, the big sound bytes about net zero haven’t actually played out for many of them. Google has been carbon neutral since 2007 due to using renewables and carbon offsets. Amazon, unfortunately one of the biggest players, is still only offsetting 50% of its massive emissions despite its pledge, and still heavily using coal and other fossil fuels. If we look beyond North America, places that do not have access to renewables are powering and cooling their servers with fossil fuels.

So while we’re waiting on the world to change, let’s roll up our sleeves. Here are some ways to help you tackle that virtual hoarding.

Challenge 38: Clean your virtual house.

Here are some tips to tackle your virtual clutter.

Stop putting so much stuff there! Before you upload something, do you really need it? Decide which files you’d actually keep if you had to print them off. Then, only upload those few. No one needs that many selfies. Instead, get a good quality backup drive, and save sensitive and important documents there. Keep them on your hard drive too. You should have at least two copies of important stuff, and it can’t hurt to have hard copies too. And, I’m sorry to say, information isn’t safer in the cloud than it is in a steel cabinet in your home. There are thousands of people trying to hack your data online. It’s unlikely a thief would grab your hard drive instead of your jewellery.

Find out what’s sucking up space. Just like cleaning a closet, the big stuff should go first. Take a look at your file list, and if you can live without it, delete it. Same goes for apps you don’t use. 

Clean out your email. Purge your spam, junk mail and anything you don’t need. Unsubscribe from things you never read, or places that send constant promotions. Get rid of old accounts completely. Delete really old emails, and all attachments. If you need them, you should download them or print them.

Stop automatically syncing everything. Does everything need to be stored on Google Drive? Keep a folder for important backups, and only sync that to your cloud storage.

Tackle photo and videos. Get a good quality photo finder, and dedicate an afternoon to deleting duplicates. Keep only photos you genuinely love (think “would I keep this if I had to print it?”), and ditch the rest. Save them on a backup drive dedicated to photos. Or, go old school and create scrapbooks, or print photobooks. If you do save photos online, you can change your upload preferences to “high quality”, which maintains the resolution nicely, but doesn’t take up as much space.

Consolidate your accounts. Do you need 5 different google accounts, really? If you don’t, get rid of some. Those of us who have hoarding in our blood may bristle at this idea. Grit your teeth and press Del.

Purge social media: You can go to settings, and download an archive of your data before you delete it online.

For more tips and step by step instructions for different platforms, check out this popular science article and this Wired article.

All this said, it is virtually impossible to completely scrub something completely from the cloud, and virtually impossible to keep it private and totally protected there. So, use it, but with discretion, and clean up your digital act. It will take you some time this week to tackle it, but, if you make a date to tidy your data regularly, you’ll be doing the planet a favour. Sorry folks, it's been a long one, but we missed you!
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Yours in Sustainability,
Sherri Jackson & Laurel Hood

52 Weeks of Climate Action was created by Sherri Jackson and Laurel Hood. Sherri is a writer, speaker and musician. She is the candidate of record and communications coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Laurel Hood, is a retired secondary teacher, transportation lead for the Collingwood Climate Action Team, and volunteer coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Visit our blog or sign up at www.52weeksofclimateaction.com.

Wednesday, 30 December 2020

Week 37: Happy New Year!

 

Week 37:

Happy New Year!

I think we can all agree that 2020 didn’t exactly shape up to be what we expected. Despite all it has not been, there are some bright spots. Global carbon emissions actually fell by seven per cent. So, that’s good news. The reason they fell (less transportation, less jobs, more stoppages, amidst a global pandemic) is not such good news. But, let’s take the good where we can.

As we stand on the precipice of a new year, we can reflect on our journey since last April, when we jumped aboard the sustainability train (electric of course), and vowed to do better. How have you done so far? Are there things you could change? Are there things you are surprised by? Hopefully you have more insight and have found peace with some new ways of doing things.

So let’s keep it going. It’s easier to make small changes, over a period of time than it is to make huge changes that you know you’re going to fail at. So, instead of vowing to overhaul your entire existence, let’s make some resolutions, together, and maybe we can hold each other accountable for seeing them through.

Challenge 37: Make your resolution environmentally sustainable.

This year, do the planet some good. Make a resolution from one of the four main categories: Transportation, Home Energy, Consumption (buying stuff), or Food.

Look back on the past challenges and see if there are any that you wanted to try, but just didn’t get to. That’s a good place to start. Think of places where you found it easiest to make changes (maybe you actually liked walking or biking to work, or found a favourite thrift shop), and make a commitment to doing more of that.

The gurus who know about this stuff offer the following tips:
  • Just pick one thing. Making a laundry list of all the things you want to change about the world will just overwhelm you. Pick one thing, and then next year, pick another.
  • Plan ahead, so you have the resources you’ll need to be successful when your resolution begins.
  • Anticipate problems, and don’t let a mistake sideswipe you. You will probably err once or twice. Don’t let it distract you from your goal.
  • Plan rewards, so when you do well, you get a gold star!
  • Make it reasonable - “saving the planet” is too broad a goal. Try buying LED bulbs, or starting meatless Mondays. You’ll get to the planet saving one step at a time!
So pick something, anything, that you feel passionate about, and that you think you could stick to. See if you can get the rest of your family involved too. You may find it easier to stay on track if all of you are on the same page. Good luck, and 2020, well, it’s been nice knowing you. Don’t let the door hit you on your way out.
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Yours in Sustainability,
Sherri Jackson & Laurel Hood

52 Weeks of Climate Action was created by Sherri Jackson and Laurel Hood. Sherri is a writer, speaker and musician. She is the candidate of record and communications coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Laurel Hood, is a retired secondary teacher, transportation lead for the Collingwood Climate Action Team, and volunteer coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Visit our blog or sign up at www.52weeksofclimateaction.com.

Wednesday, 23 December 2020

Week 36: Walking in a Winter Wonderland

 

Week 36:

Walking in a Winter Wonderland

With all the hustle and bustle of this season coming to a fevered peak, we thought you could use a little time off from all the noise noise noise noise, and maybe even free yourself up for an evening away from the ads for the latest gadget bombarding your holiday movies.

So this week is short and sweet. It won’t cost you anything, and anybody can do it.

Challenge 36: Turn off electronics, and take a walk.

Turn off your TV, your computer, and your iPad. Grab the hand of someone you love (or the leash, if they’ve got 4 legs), and head out for a walk. A December evening can be magical. Stroll along the streets and take in the lights. Or walk the trails through a moonlit forest (even if it’s only 5pm!). It’s something easy to do while social distancing. You can even safely say hello to passersby, and if you want to go all in, grab a mug of hot chocolate and make it an adventure.

The holiday rush to buy can make us forget the little things that matter. So, take the time to focus on those for just a while. Talk to the people you love. Laugh. Hug. Hold hands. Share moments. Make memories. Sing carols. Or just be together, in silence, and remember why you love each other. 

It’s a season for miracles. So, above all else, make the time to believe that something wonderful is about to happen. From Laurel and I, may your hearts be Merry and Bright, and may you be blessed with all the good things life has to offer.
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Yours in Sustainability,
Sherri Jackson & Laurel Hood

52 Weeks of Climate Action was created by Sherri Jackson and Laurel Hood. Sherri is a writer, speaker and musician. She is the candidate of record and communications coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Laurel Hood, is a retired secondary teacher, transportation lead for the Collingwood Climate Action Team, and volunteer coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Visit our blog or sign up at www.52weeksofclimateaction.com.

Wednesday, 16 December 2020

Week 35: Cash or Credit?

 

Week 35:

Cash or Credit?

Dr. Seuss had it right when he wrote The Lorax. Read as an adult, it’s a chilling account of what happens when consumer demand drives the economy, and pushes corporations into biggering and biggering. The Lorax is the voice of reason (I Speak for the Trees!) who in the end, just bails on the whole mess and leaves the Onceler in his devastated landscape. Devoid of all things, Old Onceler realizes that he’s just put himself out of business by hacking down all the trees, and destroying all the habitats. He lives the rest of his life in desolate guilt over what he’s done. Sound familiar? Hopefully we wake up before the last truffula tree falls, because we can’t lift ourselves by the seat of our pants and fly to some new land. This is it folks!

We’re the ones driving the Onceler, I’m sad to say. Advertising is the main culprit, building fantasy lives of what we could be, do, have, if we only bought the latest thneed.

This week, we’ll reconnect ourselves with our wallets, and remember that a penny saved is a penny earned. What’s a penny? Precisely why we need to have this conversation.

Challenge 35: Use cash instead of credit or debit.

Use cash instead of interac or credit if you shop for holiday gifts this week - you’ll spend less and consume less.

The pitfalls are apparent. Numbers on a screen don’t really register the same way as reaching into your pocket and forking over a mittful of twenties. And, conveniently, interac doesn’t tell you what’s left in your bank account - only that it approves of your purchase. Thanks Interac for the permission! This is the added insidiousness of consumerism. They’ve made it mindlessly easy to separate you from your hard-earned money. Just tap your way into the poor house. We’re deep in the heart of the consumerism rabbit hole now. 

Even when not buying online, we’ve become an almost cashless society, amongst the pandemic phobia about touching anything someone else has touched. But, using debit cards and credit cards disconnects you from how much you’re spending. Add to that the ease of online shopping, and soon you’ve purchased a truckload of merchandise without really registering that you’ve spent a dime. 

Yes, we’re encouraged to use cards during this uncertain time. And if that makes you more comfortable, then consider only using your interac card, and setting yourself a daily budget for how much you’ll spend. Otherwise, the sky’s the limit, as long as interac gods continue their thumbs up.

Buying with a credit card really means you’re willing to mortgage your future earnings, at a hefty interest rate, for the immediate satisfaction of getting it NOW. There have been many studies done, which indicate that people spend more when using credit than they would with cash. In some cases, people are willing to pay up to 100% more when paying by credit card than by cash. Wow!

 How plastic fuel consumerism? Because if you’re paying by cash, you’re going to watch what you spend. You’re not going to overspend because you can’t. It stops the impulse buy, and the upsell. It doesn’t even really require willpower, because you don’t have the means to go bigger. But with credit, there’s always room for more.  Even if you don’t need more, you may buy it simply because you can. It’s easy. It’s that ease which makes us one of the most consumer debt laden countries in the world. Did you know the Canadian household debt burden is 177% of our disposable income? That’s astronomical. Do we really need all that stuff?

So, this week, heed the words of the Lorax. Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing’s going to get better; it’s not. Consumption is one of the biggest fuels for climate change. We have to change our habits. Leave your credit card at home, and leave that thneed in the window. Thanks Dr. Seuss for the lesson.
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Yours in Sustainability,
Sherri Jackson & Laurel Hood

52 Weeks of Climate Action was created by Sherri Jackson and Laurel Hood. Sherri is a writer, speaker and musician. She is the candidate of record and communications coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Laurel Hood, is a retired secondary teacher, transportation lead for the Collingwood Climate Action Team, and volunteer coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Visit our blog or sign up at www.52weeksofclimateaction.com.

Wednesday, 9 December 2020

Week 34: Return to Sender

 

Week 34:

Return to Sender

We interrupt this program to bring you an important message. One of the biggest impacts you personally can have on climate change is to change your consumption habits. Whaaat? Stop buying things? Yes. That is correct. Stop buying things. But, it’s the middle of December! Now is not the time to stop buying! Yes, yes, it is the time, and it’s now or never. You don’t have to stop buying altogether, but you do have to cut down. Because, between you and your credit card, you know this can’t go on much longer. Canadians are heavily in debt, because somewhere along the line we bought into the idea that having stuff is the same as being happy. The more stuff, the happier, right? The more expensive that stuff, well, even happier. Right? Nope. But that’s what advertisers want you to believe. That if you just had their shiny new gadget to replace that other somewhat less shiny old gadget, you’d have it made. 

We also use stuff as a substitute for time together, and genuine caring. Feeling guilty about working too long at the office? Buy a gift. Feeling sad that you can’t be there on Christmas day? Send a super expensive toy to make up for it. But, as we all know, a gift isn’t 
the same thing as genuinely feeling someone truly loves you, and made the effort to spend time with you. This week we’re looking more deeply into consumerism and how it is wreaking havoc on our environment.

Challenge 34: Learn about consumerism & climate change.

Want to know how consumerism damages the planet? Here are a few videos for you. This one on The Problem with Consumerism. Did you know that the average carbon footprint expands by 650 kg in December? Yeah. And Americans spend 2.6 billion on Christmas wrapping (most of which isn’t recyclable). We have eyes bigger than our wallets. Consumerism is one of the four biggest contributors to climate change, and we are one of the biggest culprits. Yikes! 

Also, this one on tracking returns: Spoiler alert: most Amazon returns go to landfill. Yeah. You heard me. No wonder it’s so easy.

So before you max out your credit cards, take some of our tips from last week, and reduce your consumption this holiday. These videos drive home the importance of putting our priorities in the proper order. By reducing your consumption, you’ll save money, and help the planet. Another win win challenge! In the end, to coin a phrase, it’s not what you bought someone, it’s what you gave them that matters.

Yours in Sustainability,
Sherri Jackson & Laurel Hood

52 Weeks of Climate Action was created by Sherri Jackson and Laurel Hood. Sherri is a writer, speaker and musician. She is the candidate of record and communications coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Laurel Hood, is a retired secondary teacher, transportation lead for the Collingwood Climate Action Team, and volunteer coordinator for the Simcoe-Grey Greens. Visit our blog or sign up at www.52weeksofclimateaction.com.

Week 40: SpamALot

  Week 40: SpamALot We’ve been together for 40 weeks now. I think I can share some deeply personal information with you. I have a pet peeve....